Learn Lead Lift Ep 4: Your Leadership Mindset

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Learn Lead Lift Ep 3: Systems Thinking

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Learn Lead Lift Ep 2: Want To Be A Better Leader – Start Here

Subscribe to our new Flash Briefings for short, informed, and actionable business tidbits several times a week. Learn, Lead, Lift, where you can think, act, and inspire your way to greatness.

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Learn Lead Lift Ep 1: Leader, Manager or Both

Subscribe to our new Flash Briefings for short, informed, and actionable business tidbits several times a week. Learn, Lead, Lift, where you can think, act, and inspire your way to greatness.

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Get Better as a Leader Based on What You’re Doing NOW

“During a time like this, we’ll either get better as a result of what we choose to do as teams and organizations, or we’ll be diminished for what we fail to do.” – Patrick Lencioni

This quote rings incredibly true for so many of us working to keep our organizations afloat, both amid COVID-19 and in the wake of the terrible injustice that we witnessed so recently in Minnesota and Georgia, among other places. What we do in a time of crisis, in a time when everything feels so difficult–how we show up in business and in life–will profoundly impact where we are three months, six months, a year from now.

What we don’t want is for this cycle to repeat itself, again, 100 years later, as it already has.

We must take action.

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A New Paradigm for Business

It’s time for a new paradigm for business. The current unemployment number stands at 40 million Americans. One quarter of Americans filed for unemployment since the pandemic began, according to CNN. The leisure and hospitality industry has been hardest hit, with 39.8% unemployment.

Moreover, women, minorities, and low wage workers have been disproportionately impacted by the downturn. National unemployment at 14.7%. It’s 16.7% for Blacks and 18.9% for Hispanics. While women are less than half the workforce, 55% of women are now unemployed. A shocking 40% of workers with household income under $40,000 are now unemployed. This isn’t surprising. It simply shines a spotlight on the systemic inequities. 

We need a new paradigm for business. One that corrects the systemic inequities that have been in place since the dawn of capitalism. It’s time for Adam Smith’s vision for capitalism to finally come to fruition. The good news is that there’s a proven model we can use to shift the paradigm. That model is called conscious capitalism.

Conscious capitalism is based on four tenets:

  1. Higher Purpose. Conscious companies have a purpose beyond profit. In fact, they’ve seen that profit is the natural outcome of business operating from its higher purpose. Their core values are what drives them. They walk their talk. Culture immensely determines their values.
  2. Conscious Leadership. We believe that a company can only be as conscious as the least conscious of its leaders. Therefore, at conscious companies, leaders are committed to building emotional intelligence. They live from their values. They understand and work with systems intelligence. And they understand spiritual intelligence, regardless of their faith.
  3. Stakeholder Orientation. Conscious businesses take all stakeholders into consideration when they make decisions. They consider shareholders, but they also think about employees, supply chain, and more. A stakeholder is anyone or anything impacted by the business.
  4. Conscious Culture. It may seem like a conscious culture arises naturally from executing the other three tenets. But it still takes work. Creating a culture isn’t a “one and done” kind of thing. Your company’s culture is a sentient thing. It requires nurturing. That’s never been more true than it is right now. Especially with companies that have decided that remote work will be a more permanent thing. 

Why is it time for a new paradigm in business? Three key reasons emerge:

Firstly, we need a new paradigm in business to solve the systemic inequities currently in place. We need to focus on the long term because the time for short term gains at any cost is over. Between 2040 and 2050, the US will no longer be a majority white country. In many parts of the US, that’s already a reality. If we don’t solve the inequities in the system, it will collapse.

Think about what will happen to the economy when the majority of people are Black and Brown. Minorities have historically and currently held significantly less wealth than white people. It’s more difficult for them to get loans. It’s more expensive for them to buy houses. With less wealth comes less consumption. Consumption drives the GDP. Frankly, it serves everyone’s best interests to raise up the economic condition of minorities.

Secondly, in a word: millennials. They are coming into control of the largest pocket of wealth we’ve ever seen. $1.4 trillion is coming into the hands of millennials. They vote with their wallets. Consequently, they buy from companies whose values are aligned with their own. They care about the planet and believe the science about climate change. As a result, they’re doing something about it. And they expect the companies they support to chip in and help.

Lastly, it’s a good business decision. Conscious companies outperform the S&P500 by 10-14 times, depending on what study you look at. Purpose driven companies outperform the S&P500 by 15 times. What’s more, is that employees at conscious companies are 33% less likely to leave. Turnover has a high cost, approximately 133-140% of salary. Lower turnover leads to higher profits. 

In any case, we believe that companies that continue to operate as “business as usual” will cease to be relevant in the next 10-20 years. This isn’t a bandwagon you can afford to miss. Ask us how we can help.

About NextGen Orgs

Johanna Lyman is the Founder and CEO of NextGen Orgs. She is a Leadership Consultant and Executive Coach with over fifteen years of experience in implementing organization­ wide change strategies for both Fortune 500 companies and Small Businesses. 

At NextGen Orgs, they use a combination of unique delivery methods and processes that crack the code on establishing lasting organizational behavior changes in a relatively short period of time. Their proprietary and evolutionary system can eliminate months of frustration often associated with developing strong leadership and building a cohesive, collaborative team. Furthermore, Johanna is a professional speaker, available to speak on a variety of topics related to culture, communication, innovation, and leadership skills. She is the Board President for the Bay Area Chapter of Conscious Capitalism and is deeply versed in how to help businesses be a force for good in the world. Learn more (URL: https://www.nextgenorgs.com/about/). Contact Johanna at johanna@nextgenorgs.com

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Conscious Leadership: We Can Do Better

As the novel coronavirus continues to wreak havoc around the world, stories of companies rising up to do good have been popping up everywhere. Unfortunately, there are almost as many stories of company leaders being selfish and short-sighted. We can do better… and we must. The difference between the two: conscious leadership.

The Good:

Salesforce is a shining example of a conscious company. Marc Benioff, the CEO and a champion for conscious leadership called on Bay Area’s businesses to do the right thing. In late March, Benioff, turned to Twitter to call on companies to pledge not to make any “significant” layoffs for 90 days. In addition, he promised that Salesforce would continue paying hourly workers while their offices were closed. Speaking on CNBC, Benioff said, “This is a moment where business has to be the greatest platform for change.”

When NY Governor Andre Cuomo put a call for help out to NYC hotels, the Four Seasons was the first to respond. With this in mind, they quickly turned the hotel into the fanciest dormitory ever for health care workers and first responders who lived too far from work or had someone vulnerable at home they needed to stay away from. A number of hotels followed suit: the Wyeth, St. Regis, and the Plaza to name a few. The owner of the New York Four Seasons is paying for the cost to fun the hotel through his company. Considering this, Cuomo and Warner both showed conscious leadership during the crisis.

Similarly, other hotel companies like Marriott and Hilton have teamed up with strategic partners like American Express and JP Morgan Chase. Together they provided up to a million hotel rooms for health care workers and first responders. Moreover, many of the hotels are not only housing workers but feeding them as well.

Brooklyn landlord Mario Salerno is a local hero. In late March, he started hearing from tenants. They were concerned because they wouldn’t be able to make rent in April. So he decided to cancel rent for April for all eighteen apartment buildings he owns. In all, he canceled rent for eighty apartments housing some two hundred grateful tenants.  

Starbucks, who gets mixed reviews here, told workers who chose not to go into work in May they would still be paid. Whether they had the virus or were simply afraid of contracting it didn’t matter. 

The Bad:

Amazon, Starbucks, and many other companies initially raised the hourly rate of essential workers. Unfortunately, they are planning to retract the so-called hazard pay long before the hazard is behind us. We can only hope they change their minds and do the right thing.

Car manufacturers ordered people back to work around the country this week. However, workers in masks complained that it was too soon, and they were right. Ford had to close two of its plants just a day after they re-opened due to confirmed cases of COVID-19. 

Sadly, the meatpacking industry is the worst offender. Thousands of workers have become sick, and they’ve been forced back to work in unsafe conditions. Workers at a Purdue chicken plant in Georgia staged a walkout. According to the CDC, “COVID-19 cases among U.S. workers in 115 meat and poultry processing facilities were reported by 19 states. Among approximately 130,000 workers at these facilities, 4,913 cases and 20 deaths occurred.” We can do better… and we must.

What’s Next

Clearly, these are unprecedented times. We don’t know nearly enough about the virus. We aren’t testing nearly enough people. Nearly more than two months after the first counties began sheltering in place, testing still remains scarce. In other words, we are getting things wrong because there’s so much we just don’t know.

By way of contrast, the difference between companies doing the right thing and those that are the worst can be boiled down to leadership. Specifically, conscious leadership, because these individuals strive to do the right thing. Even when times are tough, they make decisions based on what’s right for their people. They make decisions based on the long term. Conscious leaders know they might miss revenue or suffer from lower profits in the short term. But the short term isn’t what they are thinking about. They focus on what Simon Sinek calls the “infinite game.” That’s a game where everyone can play, and everyone can win. That’s conscious capitalism at its best.

About:

Johanna Lyman is the Founder and CEO of NextGen Orgs. She is a Leadership Consultant and Executive Coach with over fifteen years of experience in implementing organization­ wide change strategies for both Fortune 500 companies and Small Businesses. 

At NextGen Orgs, they use a combination of unique delivery methods and processes that crack the code on establishing lasting organizational behavior changes in a relatively short period of time. Their proprietary and evolutionary system can eliminate months of frustration often associated with developing strong leadership and building a cohesive, collaborative team.

Johanna is a professional speaker, available to speak on a variety of topics related to culture, communication, innovation, and leadership skills. She is the Board President for the Bay Area Chapter of Conscious Capitalism and is deeply versed in how to help businesses be a force for good in the world. Learn more (URL: https://www.nextgenorgs.com/about/). Contact Johanna at johanna@nextgenorgs.com 

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Building Resilience in VUCA Times

If ever we were living through VUCA times, it’s now.

VUCA stands for volatile, uncertain, chaotic, and ambiguous. The financial markets are volatile and the economic crisis we’re facing is unprecedented. It seems like every day we get conflicting news about the pandemic. First, we’d get symptoms in five days, then fourteen. It can be transmitted if you’re asymptomatic, then it can’t. Countries re-open, then have to shut down again as cases spike. Masks help, or they don’t, depending on who you listen to. Conspiracy theories are everywhere… or are they? It’s frustrating to know what information to trust when everyone has an opinion about something that nobody really knows enough about. 

We are living with a collective trauma and its accompanying grief.

That’s something that hasn’t been spoken enough about. People think about grief as the feelings we have when someone near us dies. But it’s much more than that. We are (or soon will be) collectively grieving the death of old ways of working and doing business. Some are grieving the death of loved ones from COVID-19. We’re grieving the loss of physical contact if we live alone and are sheltering in place. Some are grieving the loss of privacy and personal space as they work from home. Not everyone’s home office is ideal. Many are grieving the loss of productivity as they try to shelter in place, work, homeschool kids, and maintain their mental and physical health. And still, others are grieving the loss of their jobs.

In a nutshell, our limbic systems have been hijacked. The limbic system is the part of the brain responsible for the fight/flight response to trauma. We have one of four reactions to danger: fight, flight, freeze, or fawn. These are trauma responses that have profound impact on the body when they’re activated over extended periods of time. And our limbic systems have been activated for 8-12 weeks at this point, depending on where you live.These trauma responses decrease our resiliency and our ability to access higher brain functions: not exactly ideal for long term resiliency.

In times like these, it’s necessary to redefine how we view success.

If we don’t, we’ll lose the resiliency we have left. Leaders whose companies are thriving have reported something rather surprising. What has brought teams together, built resilience, and helped them pull together to accomplish great things? Getting real with each other. Dropping the mask of perfectionism. Building resilience together. Furthermore, it’s been less about being efficient, and more about being effective. They’re figuring out how to be more effective given varying experiences of working from home. It’s about being human. We can finally bring our whole selves to work. In fact, we have no other choice.

We keep hearing anecdotal stories from clients and colleagues of leaders getting on Zoom calls with their teams. They share a story about how they’re really doing. “My mother broke her hip and I had to drop everything to help her. That’s why I’ve been mostly unavailable, and I’m sorry. She’s home now recovering from surgery.” Then they ask how everyone’s really doing. In one instance, the call lasted over two hours. The leader couldn’t believe how bonded he felt to the team, and the team to each other, after that. There are stories of people cutting out of a Zoom meeting to set up their kid’s next homeschooling module. Entire teams have “met” each others’ pets and kids over the past two months. 

Success during these unprecedented times is not just about getting results. It’s about honoring our shared humanity. Most of all, it’s about building resilience.

Johanna Lyman, NextGen Orgs

Here are some suggestions we have for building resilience during these challenging times:

  1. One of the best ways to build resilience is to uncover your Purpose. People who know their higher purpose and live each day from the values aligned with their purpose are naturally more resilient. It can be tempting to make excuses for not living your values. But we know that purpose and values act as a true North. They guide us to do the right thing always. You won’t have any regrets if you let them guide you. You won’t have to clean up any messes later, either.  
  2. Spend time developing your emotional intelligence. According to research, 90% of the difference between high performers and peers with similar skills can be attributed to their emotional intelligence. Develop self-awareness by meditating, journaling, and being self-reflective. Get curious about your emotions. Uncover exactly what emotion(s) you’re feeling and why. 
  3. Move your body every day. Trauma and the accompanying grief can get stuck in our cells. When you move your body, especially if you work up a sweat, you help move the grief and trauma out of your body. Staying physically fit also helps with mental fitness. Having a regular fitness routine can attribute to being a successful leader according to studies.
  4. Practice mindfulness. You can try a seated meditation, simply paying attention to your breath and letting go of thoughts as they arise. You can try a moving meditation like yoga, tai chi, or qi gong. Or you could simply hold your attention on whatever it is you’re doing in each moment: cooking dinner, playing with your kids, or taking a shower. There are plenty of apps you can use to help you start a meditation practice. As long as you don’t expect to have a perfectly empty mind, you’ll be fine. A Buddhist saying goes like this: “You should meditate every day for twenty minutes, unless you’re very busy. Then you should meditate for an hour.”

We’re not getting back to “normal” any time soon. That’s a good thing. “Normal” was neither healthy nor sustainable. It’s time to bring humanity back into business, for the good of all.

Johanna Lyman is the Founder and CEO of NextGen Orgs.

She is a Leadership Consultant and Executive Coach with over fifteen years of experience in implementing organization­ wide change strategies for both Fortune 500 companies and Small Businesses. 

At NextGen Orgs, they use a combination of unique delivery methods and processes that crack the code on establishing lasting organizational behavior changes in a relatively short period of time. Their proprietary and evolutionary system can eliminate months of frustration often associated with developing strong leadership and building a cohesive, collaborative team.

Johanna is a professional speaker, available to speak on a variety of topics related to culture, communication, innovation, and leadership skills. She is the Board President for the Bay Area Chapter of Conscious Capitalism and is deeply versed in how to help businesses be a force for good in the world. Learn more (URL: https://www.nextgenorgs.com/about/). Contact Johanna at johanna@nextgenorgs.com or find her on LinkedIn.

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BRAVE Cultures™: It’s Time for a New Paradigm

We Need BRAVE Cultures™ for This Brave New World

Business, as usual, has come to a screeching halt in the past several weeks. First the global pandemic, and then the profound economic crisis, have entire countries reeling. Hopes of a speedy recovery are dying in the hearts and minds of people everywhere. It’s time for BRAVE Cultures™.

It’s time for a new paradigm. BRAVE Cultures™ are the wave of the future. For leaders of companies who want to be thriving in the next ten years and beyond, they can not be complacent with business as usual.

There are four aspects to BRAVE Cultures™. The first is that they are Purpose-driven.

Being Purpose-driven isn’t just a nice thing to do; it’s great for business. Purpose driven companies have outperformed the S&P500 by 14 times over a 15 year period. That’s a 1680% ROI vs. the 118% ROI for the S&P500 (source).

Nevertheless, beyond just profits (although profits are essential), what does your company stand behind? What is it a stand for and against? Merely saying that your company has a Purpose isn’t going to cut it anymore. You can’t just slap a slogan on the wall. Consumers have smartened up. They want proof that you’re living and breathing your values and purpose. Therefore, as millennials gain more clout in the markets, both as consumers and employees, this will become even more important.

Companies with BRAVE Cultures™ operationalize the Purpose and Values of the company. This is evident in the behavior, words, and actions of all employees, from the top all the way down. Walking your talk doesn’t happen without forethought, strategy, and consistent implementation.

The second key to building BRAVE Cultures™ is that they are committed to Conscious Communication.

Conscious Communication is the container inside of which the other three aspects grow and thrive. Without it, people simply can not have the kinds of conversations needed to innovate, to be inclusive of others. They won’t be able to productively air concerns or disagreements. They won’t be able to communicate well with others on a daily basis. 

Furthermore, when we talk about Conscious Communication, we focus on three things. Emotional Intelligence, having positive Mindsets, and how to encourage healthy conflict are key. We teach teams how to master healthy conflict by having difficult conversations in real-time. We teach them how to listen deeply and being aware of the stories they’re making up about themselves and others.

Emotional Intelligence is the ability to both manage and be aware of your own emotions. It’s also about understanding and navigating the emotions of others. EQ is the cornerstone of Conscious Communication. Without a certain degree of emotional intelligence, it’s impossible to practice conscious communications.

Positive mindsets are critical to conscious leadership.

Ryan Gottfredson has recently written a book called Success Mindsets that identifies four sets of mindsets. They are: fixed/growth, closed/open, prevention/promotion, and inward/outward. For instance, according to Ryan’s research, CEOs tend to have closed mindsets as compared to any other group of people. Having a closed mindset makes it difficult to hear perspectives that don’t match your own. Having a fixed mindset makes you far less resilient in the face of obstacles and challenges. If you have a prevention mindset, you’ll lose out on opportunities. The inward/outward mindsets are about how selfish you are, or if you care more for others. 

When a team develops the skills of Conscious Communication, they are able to create a psychologically safe space. Innovation and equity thrive in psychologically safe environments. Psychological safety is the safety of knowing that all ideas and all people are valued, included and welcomed. It creates a space where processes and tools are in place to offer everyone grace and dignity. Therefore, regardless of what’s happening around us we care for our people first.. 

Inside of a psychologically safe space like that, you’ll find a BRAVE Culture™.

The third pillar of BRAVE Cultures™ is that they are wildly innovative.

They actively embrace failure. Actively embracing failure is not something that comes naturally to most of us. We were indoctrinated from a young age to believe that failure is a bad thing. To succeed in the future, we must get comfortable being uncomfortable. We must understand that failure is a necessary milestone on the path to success. We have to change the mindset of our teams to embrace short-term ‘failures’. Instead, we have to know that short-term failures pave the way to long-term success.

Most companies know they need to be more innovative. They just don’t know how to cultivate more innovation on their teams. The secret is to cultivate a mindset of failure as a learning tool. According to Inc. Magazine, “while there are lots of factors that go into success and failure,  innovation is one of the most important. Innovative businesses are more likely to stick around from year to year.”

The fourth and final pillar of BRAVE Cultures™ is that they are fiercely inclusive.

The most important thing to understand about fierce inclusion is this: it’s not about taking power away from anyone. Instead, it’s about making a bigger pie so that everyone gets a seat at the table. We ALL win when that happens. Fierce inclusivity moves beyond checking a box for gender or ethnicity, although that’s a start. Even at that lower level of diversity, companies reap financial rewards:

  • Companies that have more diverse management teams have 19% higher revenue (source)
  • Racially diverse teams out-perform homogeneous teams by 35% (source)
  • Teams where there is gender equality present earn 41% more revenue (source

Just like being Purpose-driven isn’t just the right thing to do, it’s good for business, so is being inclusive. Moreover, if you’re trying to diversify teams because you’ve read that they perform better, it won’t work. Unless you truly welcome and include the diverse members of your team, you will never get the best from them. The first step in becoming fiercely inclusive is to uncover the team’s unconscious biases.

The second step is to look at the visible signs of diversity. Hire more women, minorities, older people, and people with disabilities. Then you have to begin to understand that we are steeped in a system of privilege.That’s the third step. Once you understand that can you begin questioning the assumptions you’ve made. Consequently, you can then start to root out the organizational habits and norms rooted in white and male dominance. Becoming committed to fierce inclusion means taking a discerning look at the water in which we swim. Behaviors like perfectionism, defensiveness, and either/or thinking are symptoms of this systemic privilege. It’s time to dismantle them. We need to be more collaborative, less extractive, and we need to pay attention to all stakeholders, not just shareholders.

In Summary:

BRAVE Cultures™ are deliberately developed over time. It takes time to master the arts of Conscious Communication. Communication is what fosters fierce inclusivity and the ability to actively seek out failure for learning and innovation. In addition, they are cultures that are psychologically safe. People feel a strong sense of belonging, and because they are purpose-driven, everyone is united in what really matters. They are the future of work. BRAVE Cultures™ were made for this brave new world we’re facing today.

Author Bio:

Johanna Lyman is the Founder and CEO of NextGen Orgs. She is a Leadership Consultant and Executive Coach with over fifteen years of experience in implementing organization­ wide change strategies for both Fortune 500 companies and Small Businesses. 

At NextGen Orgs, they use a combination of unique delivery methods and processes that crack the code on establishing lasting organizational behavior changes in a relatively short period of time. Their proprietary and evolutionary system can eliminate months of frustration often associated with developing strong leadership and building a cohesive, collaborative team.

Johanna is a professional speaker, available to speak on a variety of topics related to culture, communication, innovation, and leadership. She is the Board President for the Bay Area Chapter of Conscious Capitalism and is deeply versed in how to help businesses be a force for good in the world. Learn more at https://nextgenorgs.com and find her on LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/johannalyman

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Please Don’t Celebrate Philanthropic Billionaires

Home Depot’s CEO Bernie Marcus made news last summer when he said he was giving 80-90% of his $5.9 Billion estate to his own family foundation to fund centers to help disabled veterans, care for autistic children, and fund medical research. Although he was widely acknowledged for the decision, it’s important to dig a little deeper. You need the “rest of the story” to decide if it’s really such a good thing to celebrate philanthropic billionaires.

There are a number of reasons we shouldn’t celebrate philanthropic billionaires: 

  1. They don’t donate for equity. Billionaires tend to donate significant amounts of money to their alma maters for new buildings, or hospitals for a wing named after them. Moreover, they mostly donate to education and the arts. Recognition and congratulations are what they seek for their philanthropy. It’s an ego stroke for them. Nearly 80% of them donate to education. 57% of them donate to healthcare. In contrast, less than 1% of them donate to causes like homelessness and hunger. Specifically, only .1% of billionaires donate to solve the homelessness problem. And only .1% of them donate to solve the hunger problem. 
  2. The shouldn’t have hoarded that much money in the first place. There is a fundamental flaw in the system of philanthropy. It’s the concept of infinite endowments. That is, the money is supposed to last forever. In reality, we have more than enough money sitting in various endowments right now to solve the problems of hunger and homelessness. And plenty left over for other world problems. Furthermore, if we used it all to solve the world’s problems in the next ten years, we wouldn’t need to keep the endowments going in perpetuity. For example, it would cost approximately $20 Billion to end homelessness in America. That’s half the price of Harvard University’s endowment. Think about that. Harvard could end homelessness in a year and still have $20.9 Billion left over. Yale University’s endowment could end hunger in America and still have $5.3 Billion left over. Removing this will take care of a $25 billion problem. Hunger in the whole world could be eliminated with the funds from less than a dozen of the largest endowments in the United States.
  3. They’ve been able to hoard all that money by using extractive practices that are destroying the earth and taking advantage of marginalized people. There is a terrible case study happening right now. The global pandemic has shown us that our essential workers are extremely vulnerable. Many of the grocery stores and Amazon fulfillment and delivery workers are from marginalized communities. They put themselves at risk every time they go to work. Yet companies are doing very little to show they care. Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods are doing the best job. But it’s still not enough. They only allow a certain number of people in the store at a time. Technically, shoppers could maintain social distance. However, an alarming number of shoppers are not paying attention to how far they stay from others. When shoppers ignore social distance, they put the workers at an even greater risk.

We can do better. And we must.

There is a way forward from here. It is called Conscious Capitalism. However, it’s so different from the crony capitalism we’re used to, it probably needs a totally different name. It’s a business model that is good for everyone and the planet. 

The four tenets that govern conscious capitalism are:

  1. Purpose. Conscious capitalists run their businesses with a higher purpose beyond just profit. For example: Salesforce’s purpose is to help usher in a carbon neutral world.
  2. Stakeholder Orientation. In contrast to the shareholder orientation of most organizations, conscious capitalists consider all stakeholders in their decision making. Anyone and anything impacted by the company is a stakeholder. That includes employees and their families, shareholders, supply chain, the community, and the planet.
  3. Conscious Leadership. Conscious leaders are value based and emotionally intelligent. In addition, they’re tapped into spiritual intelligence. They understand that we’re all connected and interrelated. And they practice systems intelligence. They used design thinking as a way to get the best out of their teams and processes.
  4. Conscious Culture. Lastly, conscious capitalists build conscious cultures. A conscious culture is one with high levels of psychological safety and belonging. They are great places to work. And, they have highly productive teams. The best of them are BRAVE Cultures™: purpose driven, wildy innovative, and fiercely inclusive.

In conclusion, don’t be so quick to celebrate philanthropic billionaires as they do it for their own needs rather than the welfare of others in most scenarios.

Johanna Lyman is the Founder and CEO of NextGen Orgs.

She is a Leadership Consultant and Executive Coach with over fifteen years of experience in implementing organization­ wide change strategies for both Fortune 500 companies and Small Businesses. 

At NextGen Orgs, they use a combination of unique delivery methods and processes that crack the code on establishing lasting organizational behavior changes in a relatively short period of time. Their proprietary and evolutionary system can eliminate months of frustration often associated with developing strong leadership and building a cohesive, collaborative team.Johanna is a professional speaker, available to speak on a variety of topics related to culture, communication, innovation, and leadership skills. She is the Board President for the Bay Area Chapter of Conscious Capitalism and is deeply versed in how to help businesses be a force for good in the world. Learn more (URL: https://www.nextgenorgs.com/about/). Contact Johanna at johanna@nextgenorgs.com

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